Time Goes On

One year ago we were visiting the hospital and our sweet Addie Leigh after a hectic day in airports coming home from my sister’s wedding in Seattle.

At the time-one of these nurses had a tiny human, One was cooking a sweet baby, I was in the middle of a chemical pregnancy, and two of them were just being awesome.

Today…one year later…Addie Leigh is done with hospital chemo and almost done with treatment. My sister has been married a year. The tiny humans are basically grown up, two of us now have perfect baby boys born 3 days apart, and another has a new blingy ring on her finger! And we are all still being awesome. (Obviously)

But time has gone on. As it does.

It may seem weird or morbid to miss them and I miss life at the hospital but….it’s where I see my baby. It’s where I walk where she walked and get to hug people that love her and us.

The people that held her and held us. The only people other than us that know just how brave my girl was…they know every aspect of those 8 months of our lives because they were there. They didn’t read about it on Social Media. They didn’t get text updates or secondhand stories. They didn’t try to make us feel ‘normal’. They didn’t avoid us or get uncomfortable around us. They witnessed just how sick she got and just how disabled she was.

They lived it with us everyday for 232 days. And I miss it.

I miss rounds. I miss keeping up with the Beads of Courage Journal. I miss writing everything in my notebook. I miss asking for meds and helping with therapy. I miss the terms that were part of my daily life. I miss unhooking the feeding tube and changing the sheets. I miss cleaning the room with alcohol wipes. I miss weighing diapers and hoarding bath wipes. I miss our walking route on the 6th floor. I miss catching up with whoever was on each day. I miss our techs, PA’s, NPs, and nurses. I miss Dr. Watt and Dr. Slone. I miss wagons and wheelchairs. I miss mouth swabs and diaper cream. I miss blood work printouts and medicine schedules. I miss gloves and hospital grade hand sanitizer. I miss the pink fuzzy pillow and the stack of clean blankets we changed out daily. I miss strawberry water and the best tator tots ever. I miss Princess Bibs and Minnie Mouse Hospital gowns. I miss the trains at Children’s and the stars on the ceiling. I miss massaging tiny feet and rubbing a fuzzy head.

I even miss the stupid talking elevators, beeping IV pumps, and sleeping on an egg crate.

I miss being around people who truly got it.

Most of all….I miss my sweet Sophie that all of these things revolved around. Everything about her…even the hard stuff because she was still here.

But just like this picture….time has gone on.

One year, 9 months, and 6 days.

Time without her and time away from life at the hospital that felt so normal. That time was so hard. So uncertain and so stressful but it’s part of our story. It’s part of who we are. And in a weird way, I love it. Just like I love these 4 (and SO MANY MORE on CCBD) and I love reminders like these of time spent with them.

Because ultimately these reminders remind me of my girl.

My brave brave girl.

And I can’t wait to take her little brother to this place and show him where she walked and all the people who love her too.

2 years of cancer and a lifetime of loss

I started writing this on the 18th but I just couldn’t keep going. The night of the 17th was really hard for me. I just couldn’t quit thinking of May 17, 2017…. our last night of normal at home. It was a simple night…we put together the pink princess tent that Sophie had received for her birthday and she was SO PUMPED. While Jonathan put it together she kept bouncing around him saying ‘oh boy! Oh boy! Oh boyyyyyyyy!’ And we played and played in that tent….then she went to bed….just like every other night.

The next morning, the 18th, I got up to get ready for school…I walked into her room and touched her hair, found her paci for her, and whispered goodbye….just like every other morning. Then I went to work for a long day of 3rd grade field trip.

Completely unaware that I was living the last hours of normal. The last hours of being ‘the old me.’

So that’s why I stopped writing the other day. Because thinking of those moments….the lasts… it was a lot…and trying to add two years of thoughts to that just felt like too much. But today, I’m going to keep going so….here goes…

May 18, 2019 5:00pm

It’s been 2 years, almost to the hour since Sophie stopped breathing at home and we were rushed to our local ER and then transported to Children’s in Dallas. Sometime around 2 or 3 in the morning tomorrow, will be 2 years since we heard the words “There’s a softball sized mass in her chest, it’s definitely cancer…we just don’t know what kind yet.”

And life stopped.

Right there in that Critical Care Unit room of the Children’s ER, our life stopped. All current worries and problems seemed so small. Work didn’t matter….nothing did. Just that our baby had cancer and any future we had ever pictured was gone.

We were so positive that she would beat it. From day one….even in our shock and disbelief, we knew she’d win and have this incredible testimony! Especially when her story went crazy. I started Sophie The Brave the morning after diagnosis just to keep all updates in one place and it hit 5,000 people that day. Our GoFundMe went absolutely insane. We were humbled, shocked, terrified, hopeful, thankful….surely this amazing story reaching SO many people would end out well….her purpose was to show God is Bigger!

Right?

But….if you’ve followed us then you know….it didn’t end well.

From May 18th to January 4th we fought every 1% complication and extreme side effect. A 12 week relapse that NONE of our doctors had ever seen before and catastrophic brain damage that was so rare….it wasn’t even on the side effect list. In fact, it was SO rare that she was the ONLY CHILD LIVING IN AMERICA (maybe in the world) with early onset relapsed Lymphoma and this severe chemo toxicity. And that fact came straight from the doctor at Duke University who CREATED THE DRUG.

So to put it simply….we got screwed. That’s a tacky way to say it but….it is what it is.

And we remained positive that we had a long road ahead…but that she would beat it and be this huge miraculous testimony.

So long story short…she died. Less than 9 months after that night on May 18th in the ER, she was gone. After enduring so much more than she ever should’ve had to endure.

But does that mean she still didn’t have a miraculous testimony?

According to the World view, yeah that’s what Death at 2 years old means but, not to us. We know that even though her being gone sucks so much, that her Life and even her death meant so much more than we could’ve ever planned for her. I could go on and on with example after example of that but, this is already getting kind of long and wordy so I encourage you to go back and read the stories of her. Because she very much was and IS a miraculous testimony of the love, sovereignty, and faithfulness of God.

You know, we live in the reality that we’ve had three lives. Before cancer. During Cancer. And now.

It’s not ‘After Cancer’ because once your life has been closely touched by it…or by any serious/chronic disease I’d imagine…there is no ‘after’…there’s just now.

I know families with children in remission and others who are ‘off treatment’. I know men and women who are years without disease. But….they all know the same thing…that remission doesn’t mean a whole lot. It means they don’t CURRENTLY have disease in their body. And don’t misunderstand me….that’s amazing! Remission and off treatment are HUGE and important and a relief. But. There’s always the next blood-work appointment whether it’s once a month or once a year….you’re never done with the cancer. You’re never done with making sure it’s gone.

For us it’s not much different. Even though Sophie is gone and done with cancer, we aren’t. We don’t sit and dwell on it waiting for a terrible diagnosis but It creeps in in moments of doubt and fear.

It comes when I wait for my routine prenatal blood work. Why haven’t they called yet? Is it because I’m dying? It came in the form of horrible dreams that Connor had a tumor in his chest on his ultrasound. It came when Jonathan had a bad cold and I NEEDED him to get a chest X-ray just in case. It came when my friend’s 2 year old had high fever and leg pain and I went into a panic terrified he had leukemia (he didn’t.) I can’t even think about the first time Connor gets a cough that won’t go away without starting to sweat.

Cancer seems to find us now…we hear it all the time. Most medicine commercials have ‘lymphoma’ as a possible side effect. St. Jude commercials come on literally all the time. My best friend’s dad has Metastatic Melanoma. My chiropractor’s 2 year old was diagnosed with Leukemia. My sister’s best friend just beat Lymphoma for the 3rd time. It’s time for my annual dermatologist skin check. And on and on and on it goes……because there is no ‘after’ cancer. Even when the one with cancer isn’t here anymore.

But God.

We couldn’t deal with the anxiety and fear without the Faith that He has us in His hand. That even if the worst happens, Again, that God is still Bigger than all of it. And no matter what the last 2 years has brought….and it’s brought a lot…. but still through it all, He is Bigger.

He was bigger before cancer.

He was bigger during Cancer.

He’s still Bigger now and will continue to be Bigger forever.

Baby Brother’s Big Scan

I’d be lying if I said that this pregnancy has been easy. Ironically, it’s been physically an absolute dream so far-completely different that the first 18 weeks with Sophie. Not being on full restricted bed rest with constant hemorrhaging…obviously that’s been amazing. And I knew that mentally and emotionally this would be hard…adding hormone overload to to grief was never going to be fun. It’s been harder than I anticipated.

Trying to balance extreme sadness with extreme joy without feeling guilty about it. Managing such big feelings of loss and wanting to prepare for something new. Being completely torn with so badly wanting another girl but, also being really excited for something new with a sweet boy.

It’s been a rollercoaster.

So naturally, I’ve been a nervous and anxious wreck leading up to our big 18 week anatomy ultrasound. All I’ve wanted was to see fingers and toes and healthy organs. I’ve been terrified that they’d find a giant softball sized tumor in his chest like his sister’s. I’ve needed to lay eyes on him.

Yesterday, we got that.

Connor is absolutely perfect. He’s measuring exactly where he should be. His brain, heart, and other systems are all perfect. There’s no tumors. He’s just a tiny, sweet little boy….he’s DEFINITELY a boy.

He even looks a lot like Sophie’s 18 week ultrasound. And we are so thankful. It made it even more real. Seeing him looking like a real human-and he’s ok…it took a weight off I didn’t even realize was there.

Will that weight stay off? Probably not. That’s just how grief and anxiety work. It’s how life after cancer works. But it’s life…it’s our life. Continually living between sadness and joy while being filled up with unending Grace from the One who loves us more than we can imagine.

#SophietheBrave #DoMoreForSoph #GodisBigger #OneDayCloser #cancermom #childhoodcancerawareness #lymphomasucks #childloss #lossmom #rainbowbabybrother #ConnorJackson #BigSisterSoph

2nd Annual Sophie The Brave Day

I’ve been reflecting on Sophie’s birthday for the last week and it was such a sweet day. A day that carried a lot of anxiety but also so much happiness.

We visited the hospital and it was so special. I reached our to friends and family on my personal page about wanting to shop for the Child Life department and they showed up in an amazing way! Over $800 was donated to go towards this shopping!

We were able to get a HUGE haul of activity packs, books, and supplies for the prize closets. We got 4 nurse goodie baskets for each of the Oncology units. We were even able to get extension cords and phone batteries for parents as well as laundry pods for Ronald McDonald House.

And we delivered it all!

I love this hospital. I love walking where she walked and seeing the places she loved. I love the people there. They know us in a way that no one else ever will. They knew and loved our girl. They cared for her in her weakest and us in ours. For me, being there feels like going home and the people there feel like family.

It was a sweet day in spite of the sad.

Beauty from ashes.

And next year, little brother will get to visit too.

You should be 4

4 years ago, on March 19, 2015, I hoisted my very pregnant self out of bed at 6:15 and started to get ready for work. I was 38 weeks pregnant exactly and feeling great. I had been to the doctor the day before and she said she’d be surprised if I made it to my due date. I had had zero Braxton Hicks contractions and really no other signs of labor so I started my day like I always did. I was in the bathroom brushing my teeth when….I sneezed….and my water broke. Like movie theater, complete fish, water breaking. I froze toothbrush still in my mouth and stared at myself in the mirror.

Oh man.

This is happening.

So, I threw a towel on the floor and started calling! I called my doctor, my boss, my mom, and finally Jonathan…who of course, had woken up earlier than normal and decided to go on to the gym. I knew he’d take a bit to get home so I finished getting dressed, packed the last few things in my labor bag, and folded the last load of laundry. Our house was officially ready for Sophie.

When Jonathan got home, we loaded up and headed out. I hadn’t started contracting or anything yet so we weren’t even frazzle. Just ready to meet our girl. Then, they started. I started having some pain about 20 minutes before we got to the hospital and of course…it was 8AM so we went through 200 school zones!

We finally got to the hospital and I knew something was off. The contractions weren’t terrible but my back/tailbone area hurt so bad I couldn’t stand up. Upstairs in L&D we got checked in and settled into a triage room with my nurse Jacinda and I couldn’t even sit down my back hurt so bad. She suspected back labor was the culprit. Everything else was great. My water had, in fact broken. Sophie was doing great with a strong heart beat. My contractions were coming 3-5 minutes apart and I was dilated to a 3. My blood pressure was great…it was just that dang back pain. I had to stand up with my elbows on pillows. I

Initially hadn’t planned on getting my epidural until I was a little further along because I wanted to be able to walk around. But the back pain was too much so Jacinda was an angel from heaven and got the anesthesiologist to me 45 minutes after I checked in.

After that, the rest of the day was pretty low key. I was pain free…stuck in bed…but I was comfortable. Friends and family came in and out, I took a nap, Sophie was still doing great and my contractions were still progressing. It was slow but not too bad.

FINALLY, at 5:30pm I was a 10 and it was time to push. The first push was hard but my doctor said ‘I see her head! This will go fast!’……but an hour later, still no baby. She was stuck. We realized that the reason I was having such horrible back labor was that Sophie was what they call ‘OP’… meaning she was face up instead of face down. So her shoulders were stuck in my pelvis. She was still doing great, her heart rate was fine…but I was exhausted. We decided one more push and if she didn’t come out then I’d have to have a c-section. At that point I was honestly fine with any option that got her here safely.

Thankfully, that last push, with a little help, brought out my perfect 6lb 9oz 19 1/2 inch long Sophie Kay Skiles. She was perfect! They immediately put her on my chest and I just stared at her. I don’t remember anything else…Jonathan cutting the cord, my doctor finishing up and leaving….nothing…just her-on my chest-looking at me.

She was perfect. The hospital stay was uneventful and honestly pretty great. She nursed like a champ. We got pretty decent sleep all things considered. And we had our perfect one.

I miss her today. So much. But, I’m also overcome with thankfulness that I was able to spend 2 years 9 months and 16 days with my perfect Punkin. I’m thankful for every second.

So today, be thankful for those you love…and those you lost. And maybe today, Do More for my Sophie. Be kind…go out of your way to make someone’s day. Because she made every day amazing.

Happy Birthday my little love.

I loo much.

A year of lessons

I’ve been really thankful lately.

We made it through year one mostly in one piece…at least as ‘whole’ as we can be without Sophie.

Sophie.

I’m just so thankful for her.

Her life.

Our perfect time together as a family in our little pink house. Watching her with her daddy. Her laugh. Her brown eyes. Her sass and independence. Her excitement for literally everything. Even her illness because in that she taught me so much about myself, about what really matters…and about what it means to be brave.

Truly, unflinchingly Brave.

The past year has taught me a lot about myself in the sense that I’d never have ever painted myself as someone who could live after losing a child. My mom has always said ‘If anything ever happened to you kids they’ll just need to bury me next to you.’ And ever since I got pregnant with our first and then with Sophie I’ve felt the same way.

But then it happened. My child actually died. And I couldn’t just stop living. I couldn’t get in the ground with her. Life moves forward even when yours is standing still.

But how?

The last year of loss and the 7 months before that of cancer have taught me that it’s not possible without two things-faith and your people.

We’ve been held up and supported in overwhelming ways by so many different groups of our people.

Our family. Church family. Amazing friends who are family. Coworkers. Nurses. The Childhood Cancer community. Strangers. Online communities. Organizations. Businesses. Churches. Towns. Other loss parents.

The list is long and absolutely incredible. People matter in good times but especially the ones that show up and stay around for the bad stuff. That’s what love in action looks like. Just showing up and not forgetting.

God has put such amazing people in our lives and we can only pray that over time we can be there for them as they’ve been here for us. Some days I’m just overwhelmed at how much He has provided over the last 20 months. While Sophie wasn’t healed here on earth, God has been big enough to sustain and hold us through every step. The examples of grace and provision I could list are just mind blowing…maybe one day I’ll just post a list of it all. He has been good to us even in the bad. He was so good to give us Sophie for the time we had her and He continues to be good to us in her absence and in allowing us to share her story.

So yeah, the last year has been unimaginable and hard. But it’s also been powerful. There were weddings that gave us a new sister and brother. We had birthdays full of incredible love. So many Amazing trips and opportunities to share Sophie with thousands. We’ve grown as individuals and as a couple. Our marriage is in a place that can be hard but it’s also the greatest joy in my life.

And I’m thankful.

When God’s provision doesn’t feel good…

If someone asked you what provision means to you, what would you say?

I feel like most of us would say being financially stable, our family’s health, new homes, overall happiness, etc. are all examples of how we are provided for.

Nothing is wrong with wanting these things and seeing them as good provision from the Lord.

But, what if provision doesn’t come if n the way you expect? It’s challenging for us to see provision when it’s different than what we think it should be.

In Scripture, ‘provide’ can be translated to ‘to see’….So in Genesis 22 when Abraham names the mountain where he’s spared from sacrificing Isaac “The Lord Will Provide”…we can also say “The Lord Will See.”

He sees us. He always sees…therefore, He always provides. And His constant awareness of us means His constant provision.

Faith means knowing that every act of provision in my life is for MY good and for HIS glory. Even if it doesn’t look good to my worldly eyes.

Am I saying that Sophie’s illness and death are good? Absolutely not. I’m saying that I believe the Word of God is all true at all times. And because I believe that, I believe that He ONLY acts for my good. Sophie’s death was not good but, I believe He is and will continue to use her for my good and His glory. I believe that His plan for her life, my life, and the lives of those she has affected is so much bigger and more complex than my brain will ever be able to understand while I’m here. I believe that I can do ALL things through Him. I believe that He sent His Son to die so that I could be reunited with Him and with Sophie in eternity. And I also believe the hard stuff. I believe that in this world there will be trials. I believe that suffering perfects my faith. I believe the world is broken and that death, pain, and grief are part of being here. I believe it all. Does that make sense?

He’s providing all of it. The grace to get through the suffering. The whispers through His word that fortify our souls and encourage us. The joy that comes from the promises of redemption and victory over death, grief, and tears.

Yes, provision of the things we need to survive here on earth, is important but, the real provision… the provision for our souls…the fact that He sees us…that’s where we get our confidence to keep going.

He sees you. He’s with you. He will provide. Always.

Share with someone that might need a reminder that in the twists and turns of their life…they are seen.

*Song lyrics from Todd Wright Band

https://www.praisecharts.com/songs/details/71499/cant-see-sheet-music/

#SophietheBrave #DoMoreForSoph #GodisBigger #OneDayCloser #childhoodcancerawareness #lymphomasucks #cancermom #lossmom #childloss